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Archive for the ‘Start-Ups’ Category

The Time is Ripe for Physicians to Become Mobile Medical App Entrepreneurs

Posted by Plish on December 21, 2013

On September 25th of this year, after approximately 2 years of soliciting comments from Industry, the FDA released a guidance document entitled “Mobile Medical Applications.”  The document defines under what circumstances smartphone apps, and the like, are considered medical devices.   The reason that this is important is because if you or I create an app that performs some medical function, (e.g. it turns a phone into an electrocardiogram that records and sends irregular heartbeats to the doc,) it becomes a medical device and as such, regulations require that you register yourself with the FDA as a medical device manufacturer and become compliant to the regulations.  You may even have to submit a pre-market notification to the FDA for the app you choose to commercialize.  Ignore these regulations and you could be fined and even thrown in jail.

By issuing this document, the FDA acknowledged that it’s in the 21st century and that medicine is becoming more and more mobile.  It’s also acknowledged that the mobile medical industry is only in its infancy, so rather than anticipate what types of apps should be classified as medical devices, it created a framework for determining when an app is a medical device. (The ECG app I mentioned is but one example.) All in all, whereas most new regulations often can stifle innovation, this document isn’t like that.  It actually can further innovation.

This is because one particular group of developers (who also happen to be the app users) are in a privileged place – they are not considered medical device manufacturers and  hence  not required to register with the FDA.  Who are these folks?

Licensed medical practitioners (physicians, dentists, optometrists, etc.).

These professionals are able to innovate in a way that other app developers are not…with one caveat.  These doctors can only use their apps in the context of their own practices (or keep them within their group.) If a doctor chooses to commercialize the app, she then becomes a medical device manufacturer and all the regulations kick in.

Still, even with this caveat, physicians are in a very good place, entrepreneurially speaking.

Think about it.

By exempting physicians who create and use mobile medical apps,  physicians can:

  1. Receive real-time feedback on the suitability of the app for its purpose and modify/optimize it as needed.
  2. As a result of number 1, they  can ascertain what the potential market for the app may be.
  3. Buzz can be created about the app (both amongst patients and doctors) and results can be published if desired.

The above benefits are things that are very hard to come by in the medical device world (for that matter, they’re often difficult to obtain for non-medical products and services!)   In addition, they enable physician entrepreneurs to see if a business case can be built around the app.  If it can, time and money can be spent on registering with the FDA and becoming regulatorily compliant – in short, a medical device company can be started and the product commercialized.  (It’s important to note here that not all mobile medical apps are the same, even if they are regulated.  Some are under more stringent regulations than others and require different types of manufacturing systems.)

Again, this is an enviable position for physicians to be in.  Not too many entrepreneurs in regulated industries are allowed to do what physician entrepreneurs are able to do.  It will be interesting to see how many physicians answer the call to create apps that help others, and then build businesses from those apps.

If you’re a physician entrepreneur, or a non-physician entrepreneur, with a mobile medical app, I’d love to hear your story.  If you’re confused by the regulations, I’m here to help.

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Posted in culture of innovation, Design, Entrepreneurship 2.0, Healthcare, innovation, Medical Devices, Quality Systems, Start-Ups | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments »

Makers – The New Industrial Revolution (Book Review)

Posted by Plish on February 7, 2013

The other day I picked up a copy of Makers – The New Industrial Revolution, by Chris Anderson.

It’s an exploration of the Maker movement and its place on the world-wide stage.

If I could sum up this book with one word it would  be:

Inspirational

Yes, inspirational.

He makes a good case for the argument that the Maker movement is here to stay and it’s buttressed by enthusiastic people who are empowered by the democratization of manufacturing technologies worldwide.  Indeed, as one chapter is entitled, “We Are All Designers Now.”

We can all take part in designing and manufacturing products, and even help each other in the process.  The internet is the great equalizer and it enables people to reach each other, and niches that, while perhaps not in the millions, are substantive enough to enable the development and growth of business.  The internet also gives access to manufacturing methodologies such as 3-D printing, laser cutting, and CNC machining, making the machine shop as close as your laptop.

He cites multiple case studies of companies (including his own) that leverage technology and the power of crowds (which is also the power of individual dreams) to build sustainable businesses.

The book is an easy, clean read.  There is some minor redundancy in writing style but it’s not off-putting.  Also, if you already are familiar with manufacturing technologies like 3-D printing, there are small chunks of the book that won’t give you any new information.

I’ve already shared this book with a friend who is involved in artistic co-creation, and this book excited him as well.

If you’d like to learn more about the Maker movement, if you’d like to be inspired by stories of how Makers are redefining manufacturing business worldwide, if you want to understand how Maker businesses have the potential to expand and become disruptive economic machines, you do want to read this book.

Ignore it at your own risk.

 

************

There’s a great interview with Chris Anderson, about the Maker movement, over at Wharton.

 

Posted in Arts, Books, Case Studies, Co-Creation, creativity, Crowdsourcing, culture of innovation, Design, Disruptive Innovation, Entrepreneurship 2.0, Innovation Tools, invention, Open Source, problem solving, Reviews, Social Networking, Start-Ups, The Future, Web 2.0 | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Entrepreneurship for the Arts and the Creativity Economy

Posted by Plish on January 24, 2013

Click to go to article

Click to go to article

Being an entrepreneur,  building a dream and sharing it with people requires nothing less than a healthy dose of creativity.   But this really informative blog post over at StartUpOwl (with some great resource links as well!) speaks of a creative economy and how important creativity is to the future of all industries and culture in general.

Think about it, the arts can help healing, build communities, and even start revolutions.  We don’t see it in the United States too often, but in many countries, the ‘bad guys’ that go to prison are artists, musicians and writers.

That’s the power of the arts and creativity!

~~~

It’s horrible to end up in chains

 To die in captivity,

But it’s worse to be free

 And to sleep, and sleep, and sleep—

 And to fall asleep forever,

 And to leave no trace

 At all, as if it were all the same

 Whether you had lived or died!

 1845 – Taras Shevchenko, “Mynaiut’ dni, mynaiut’ nochi”

Posted in Arts, Authenticity, creativity, culture of innovation, Design, Entrepreneurship 2.0, Human Rights, innovation, Musical Creativity, problem solving, Social Innovation, Start-Ups, The Future, The Human Person, Workplace Creativity | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Innovation and Weeds

Posted by Plish on November 10, 2012

First on the scene – last to leave

Opportunistic

Propagate brilliantly

Efficient

Thrive where others struggle

Become the new ‘normal’

Difficult to get rid of

WEEDS

Who wouldn’t want their organization/product/service to have the above traits – to thrive like a weed in a field where others struggle?  Differentiating and proliferating, authentic and proud!

~~~

When I was younger we were on a family camping trip.  In the morning we went on a hike, escorted by a local ranger.  He would point out various plants and say, “Weed, or wildflower?” His point was that depending upon the context, one person’s weed was someone else’s wildflower.

Weeds are in the eyes of the beholder.

What do you think  Hewlett-Packard thinks Apple is?

Posted in Authenticity, Brands, culture of innovation, Design, innovation, nature, Service Design, Start-Ups, Workplace Creativity | Tagged: , , , , | 1 Comment »

A Review of ‘Creative Milwaukee at Work’

Posted by Plish on September 30, 2012

“If you want a creative life, do what you can’t and experience the beauty of the mistakes you make”

“Cheating outside school is called collaboration”

On Friday, September 21, friend and colleague, Natasha Lyn Wier, went to the first Creative Milwaukee at Work summit.  Sponsored by the Creative Alliance Milwaukee, it was held at the MIAD (Milwaukee Institute of Art & Design).  The following are some of her thoughts, for which I am extremely grateful!  My thoughts on her thoughts will be in italics.  Based on what I heard and saw in pics, this is a must see next year.  

Just walking into MIAD to register and attend the opening of Milwaukee at Work, you could feel the attendees’ energy and eagerness to learn and share.  Attended by Milwaukee educators, creatives and business professionals, the one day conference was filled with panel discussions and breakout sessions geared towards the growth of creative professionals.  The variety of artists, designers, educators, and business professionals took part in 4 sessions of their choice, and an all-conference panel discussion.  With speakers ranging from successful start-ups to corporate company directors, sessions and panelists provided information on resources and tools to inspire growth, provide development and highlight thought-provoking issues specific to local Milwaukee Creatives. 

To start off my day I joined the first discussion panel of the morning: “The Role of Creative Education in Talent Development”.  The panel was comprised of department heads and educators from surrounding colleges: Alverno, MIAD, Marquette University, Mount Mary, and UW-M.  The topic presented for discussion originated from a talk given by Sir Ken Robinson and animated for the RSA (Royal Society for the encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce): Changing Education Paradigms.  The world-renown education expert, Sir Ken Robinson, raised the question on the structure of formal instruction: How do we educate children for the 21st century?  He argued that the weakness of the current model is that is suits the time of the Enlightenment and the Industrial Revolution, all the while pointing to the challenges that need to be addressed for an economy that is ambiguously defined.

The question is not local, but the solutions envisioned by the Milwaukee area institutions were.  The Panelists each presented changes they’ve made to programs based upon their efforts to, “Try to solve Sir Robinson’s problem in Milwaukee”, as Associate Dean at the Peck School of the Arts of UW-Milwaukee, Scott Emmons, Ph. D put it.  Several locally conducted studies revealed that among employers, the number one item required was the ability to problem solve. (!!!) Discussion then followed on what changes to education can foster a creative society that not only meets the demands of today’s workplace, but defines how Milwaukee’s educational institutions could benefit today’s pupil’s, future professionals and employers.  This dialogue from the first session Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in creativity, Creativity Leadership, culture of innovation, Design, innovation, Innovation Tools, problem solving, Social Innovation, Social Responsibility, Start-Ups, Workplace Creativity | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments »

Brilliant and Innovative Idea for Restaurateurs (and Other Businesses)

Posted by Plish on September 18, 2012

 

Want to start your own restaurant but don’t know the business “ins” and “outs”?

Head over to Finland and check out the “Open Kitchen” initiative.

It’s purpose?

Open Kitchen is a programme that demystifies the business of food by creating a forum for you to learn from the city’s experienced food business people who’ve been there and done that, and then working with your peers to build and run a prototype restaurant for a week.

What do you think of this? Could it be used for other industries?

Posted in culture of innovation, Design, Entrepreneurship 2.0, Food, innovation, Service Design, Start-Ups | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Check Out This Summit Celebrating Creativity and Commerce in Milwaukee (and Other Resources!)

Posted by Plish on August 31, 2012

I live about halfway between Chicago and Milwaukee. Chicago usually gets all the top billing with regards to innovation.  I’ll admit it,  I love Milwaukee but I’m guilty of perpetuating that perception.

That changes today.

I came across this article over at BizTimes.com.  Creative Alliance Milwaukee is hosting a one day summit, bringing together creative people of all types, with the following goal:

Through a series of panels, breakout speeches, a trade show, a showcase of Milwaukee’s creative initiatives, live music, onsite artists and an exclusive Creative Salon session, the summit will illustrate how creativity is alive and well in Milwaukee.

I got excited just reading the press release.

Then, when digging into the Creative Alliance Website I came across an amazing resource: A report that highlights over 20 coworking/maker spaces in the Milwaukee area.  That’s 20!  Whether you’re talking innovation from the perspective of a tech business startup or from the perspective of an artist, there’s a collaborative space for you.  Check out the pdf report here.

This is an exciting movement and something that needs to be supported – not just by artists, but by the business community.  Creativity is a powerful asset and the contributions, and support, of creative people can only stimulate innovation and build the economy.

Check out the above websites and let me know what you think.  If you’re in the area, I’ll see you in Milwaukee on Sept. 21 for the Summit.

It’ll be well worth it!

Posted in creativity, Design, Education, innovation, Musical Creativity, Social Innovation, Start-Ups | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Great New Tool for Collaboration (and More!) – Use a ‘Big Marker’

Posted by Plish on July 19, 2012

What do GoTo Meeting, Dropbox, and Ning have in common?

Not much really.

So, if you want to web conference, share files and create a community presence on the web, you need to subscribe to all the above services and maybe more.

Enter Big Marker.

BigMarker.com is a one-stop shop – and the majority of features are free.  Those that aren’t are very reasonably priced. And, there’s nothing to download; it’s all web-based.

Seth Godin describes a tribe as, “a group of people connected to one another, connected to a leader and connected to an idea;” it’s people with, “a shared interest and a way to communicate.”

Big Marker is essentially a tribe builder.

Public or private, project management or social widgets, educate or elucidate, Big Marker can help you innovate!

~Would love to hear your experiences using Big Marker~

Posted in Creative Thinking Techniques, culture of innovation, Disruptive Innovation, Education, innovation, Innovation Tools, Project Management, Start-Ups, Team-Building, Web 2.0 | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Goooooooooooal!!! An Innovation that Impacts Life Beyond the Soccer Field

Posted by Plish on June 7, 2012

Soccer is a sport that’s loved worldwide (where it’s often known as futbol/football/kickball). Just like this image I took when I was in Ukraine a few years back (which is co-hosting the Euro Cup this year), scenes like this one are playing out all over the world, even in countries that have crippling economic hardships. 

Being the son of Ukrainian born parents and living next door to folks born in Germany, I was playing soccer  early in life (long before “Soccer Mom” was even a phrase) and later played in Chicago’s Semi-Pro leagues.   I could never figure out why soccer wasn’t more common among my peers here in the US.   It’s a sport that is easy to outfit. All you need is a ball and somewhere to kick it.  And, like the above picture shows, the space doesn’t even need to be grass-covered.

So when I saw this innovation, I was blown away.

It’s all about the ball.

These two entrepreneurs hatched this brilliant idea as part of an ‘engineering for non-engineers’ class.  Check out the video.

 

Leveraging things you wouldn’t normally connect (that’s the key to great innovations!) – soccer and the need for energy in parts of the world that don’t have easy access to it – this amazing and fun innovation was born.

In this age of “There’s an app for that”, it truly is refreshing to see a fun innovation that fits so seamlessly into kids daily lives and provides a benefit going well beyond those that exercise provides.   And, if you donate one of these balls, you don’t just contribute to the well-being of kids, you contribute to the well-being of the communities they belong to.

Well done!!!

Posted in children, Customer Focus, Design, games, innovation, Play, Social Innovation, Sports Creativity, Start-Ups, Sustainable Technology, toys, Wellness | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

The Three Building Blocks of Indie Capitalism – Ignore Them at Your Own Risk

Posted by Plish on December 8, 2011

Bruce Nussbaum over at fastcodesign.com has been blogging lately on creativity and what he coins is a new trend: Indie Capitalism.

The four traits of the Indie Capitalism are:

  1. It’s local, not global, and openly cares about the community and jobs.
  2. It’s not transactionally, but socially, based.
  3. It’s a maker system of economics based on creating new value, not trading old value.
  4. Materials and products are embedded with heightened meaning.

When I look at these four traits of indie capitalism, three foundational building blocks can be extracted:

  1. Relationships – Between people, cultures, the world and its raw materials.
  2. Emotional Import – People have histories and they live in contexts that can sometimes dehumanize. People need to feel!
  3. Value – This is often tied into the emotional level of experience.  When products or services uniquely meet needs, and they’re shared in the context of relationships, they have value.  This goes beyond technological value.  Things have value because of the story they tell.

How well does your organization emphasize, or enable REV! ?

Relationships – Emotion – Value 

Society is enabling people to conduct business in ways that build upon these.

It’s intimate and it’s provocative.

It pulls people in as opposed to pushing product out.

Ignore it at your own risk…

 

Posted in Authenticity, creativity, culture of innovation, Customer Focus, Design, innovation, Play, Social Innovation, Social Networking, Social Responsibility, Start-Ups, Sustainability, The Future, The Human Person, Trends | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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