ZenStorming

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Archive for the ‘Web 2.0’ Category

Minds.com – THE Open Source Portal to the Social Web

Posted by Plish on October 4, 2013

I clicked on the link in Facebook and was brought to a matrix of videos, pictures, words…information.  I scrolled down, clicked…

Amazing… share it…

Scroll…

Click…

Wow…share it…

Welcome to Minds.com

Who are they?

We are organizing the world’s free information and liberating the people of the net through dedication to decentralization, creative commons and digital democracy.  You are a co-creator of this network.

We want to build an app with every active free and open source project on the Internet in order to create a legitimate universal alternative to closed-source surveillance corporations like Google, Facebook, Yahoo, Apple, Microsoft, Twitter, Amazon and so on.  This includes search, social networking, clouds, video, images, docs, maps, video chat, markets, mobile and even alternative currencies.  We still want to share and interact with those networks in many cases, but we don’t want to be reliant on them at all.

Motivated by the centralization of power of the Twitters, Facebooks, Googles, etc., Minds.com will decentralize the social web and offer people choices – three of them when you sign up:

1. Create a channel on Minds.  (Just like you would make a profile on other social nets)

2. Launch a social network on Minds. (Your own customized version of our entire site that we host for you)

3. Download the code and host it all yourself.  (The decentralized option at Minds.org)

A great description of their philosophy and everything they’re doing is here.

This isn’t what everybody’s been calling Web 3.0

This is disruption

Co-creating and empowering

A Maker Movement for the Social Web

Think about a future where social networks are democratized, where information is shared across platforms, where the control is in your hands…

~Dream~

As of the time of writing, there was 352 days, 6 hours & 20 minutes until the free code would be released.

Until then, head on over to Minds.com, join in the fun and start building the social web that you want.

I’d love to hear your thoughts. How do you envision this being used?

 

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Posted in Co-Creation, Disruptive Innovation, innovation, Maker Movement, Open Source, Social Innovation, Social Networking, Society, The Future, Web 2.0 | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Makers – The New Industrial Revolution (Book Review)

Posted by Plish on February 7, 2013

The other day I picked up a copy of Makers – The New Industrial Revolution, by Chris Anderson.

It’s an exploration of the Maker movement and its place on the world-wide stage.

If I could sum up this book with one word it would  be:

Inspirational

Yes, inspirational.

He makes a good case for the argument that the Maker movement is here to stay and it’s buttressed by enthusiastic people who are empowered by the democratization of manufacturing technologies worldwide.  Indeed, as one chapter is entitled, “We Are All Designers Now.”

We can all take part in designing and manufacturing products, and even help each other in the process.  The internet is the great equalizer and it enables people to reach each other, and niches that, while perhaps not in the millions, are substantive enough to enable the development and growth of business.  The internet also gives access to manufacturing methodologies such as 3-D printing, laser cutting, and CNC machining, making the machine shop as close as your laptop.

He cites multiple case studies of companies (including his own) that leverage technology and the power of crowds (which is also the power of individual dreams) to build sustainable businesses.

The book is an easy, clean read.  There is some minor redundancy in writing style but it’s not off-putting.  Also, if you already are familiar with manufacturing technologies like 3-D printing, there are small chunks of the book that won’t give you any new information.

I’ve already shared this book with a friend who is involved in artistic co-creation, and this book excited him as well.

If you’d like to learn more about the Maker movement, if you’d like to be inspired by stories of how Makers are redefining manufacturing business worldwide, if you want to understand how Maker businesses have the potential to expand and become disruptive economic machines, you do want to read this book.

Ignore it at your own risk.

 

************

There’s a great interview with Chris Anderson, about the Maker movement, over at Wharton.

 

Posted in Arts, Books, Case Studies, Co-Creation, creativity, Crowdsourcing, culture of innovation, Design, Disruptive Innovation, Entrepreneurship 2.0, Innovation Tools, invention, Open Source, problem solving, Reviews, Social Networking, Start-Ups, The Future, Web 2.0 | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Finding the Real Niches for 3D Printing

Posted by Plish on February 3, 2013

3-D printing is cool and it has its place, but we keep asking it to do everything.  We want it to be the go-to technology for making toys, utensils, art, food, etc.   And yes, there are companies like Ponoko that are built around these technologies, and they’re quite successful, but the question still needs to be asked:

Are we using 3-D printing tech to its strengths?

Neil Gershenfeld of MIT, and author of Fab:The Coming Revolution on Your Desktop, sums it up well by saying:”…The killer app for digital fabrication is personal fabrication. Not to make what you can buy in Wal-Mart, but to make what you can’t buy at Wal-Mart.”

To “make what you can’t buy at Walmart.”

That’s exactly the point!

Yet, if you look at what 3-D printing is being used for, with the exception of some creative art and its use by architectural and design firms, 3-D printing is, by and large, being used to make what can be bought at Walmart, or some other store.

Recently Nokia, in its attempt to ride the buzz of 3-D printing, started providing files so that people can print their own phone cases. Yes, people with some 3-D design software acumen can make their own cases, and no doubt will come up with some really cool ideas.  But, the point remains, these same parts can be bought finished and then customized with colors, overlays, etc., and (this is a biggie) no software knowledge is required.

So that brings me to the main point of this post.

If 3-D printing is ever going to truly blossom and be a force to reckoned with, it needs to be more than just another way to do something that is already being done.  It needs to stand on its own as a technology that says, “Only I can do this and without me you will never see this come to fruition!”

For that statement to be made, we first must truly understand the strengths of 3-D printing technologies.  Once we know what can and can’t be done, we can then look for those problems for which 3-D printing is the ultimate solution.  It’s a little bit backward to think this way, but it often happens that new technologies start as solutions looking for problems.

So, let’s put the power of the web to work and crowdsource the future of 3-D printing. To do that, we need to answer the following questions:

What is it that 3-D printing can do that other technologies can’t?

Where are 3-D printing’s strengths?

What can 3-D printing do that molding technologies or machining, or thermoforming can’t do?

Here’s a quick, short list to get the ball rolling:

  • Make things in layers
  • It can create by controlled melting/bonding and curing type processes
  • Can make hollow objects
  • Can make objects within objects
  • Can reproduce digital data in 3-D (This enables us to hold something that otherwise can’t be held, i.e. Using CT scan data to build skulls for surgical planning)
  • ???

I’m sure there is more that can be added to this list.  Please share what you think 3-D printing does well.   Feel free to either comment here or on twitter, use  #3Dstrengths.  I’ll compile the responses and let’s see if we can’t find a niche for 3-D printing that brings real, sustainable value beyond what 3-D printing is being used for today. If you have a niche idea, use #3Dniches.

Thanks and looking forward to the responses!!

Posted in Arts, Design, Disruptive Innovation, innovation, Innovation Tools, Open Source, problem solving, Web 2.0 | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments »

Empowering the Co-Creation of a Better World – Check out the “Shaping the Future Global” Web-Based Conference

Posted by Plish on December 6, 2012

Today I pre-recorded my interview for the Shaping the Future Global Conference. The talk is entitled, “Empowering the Co-Creation of a Better World.”  It will go live at 9pm EST on Friday, Dec. 7.  You can listen below.

The rest of the schedule, with the archive of the previous two days’ worth of presentations is here. There are some amazing presentations there on health, education, wellness and human rights.

It’s free.

It’s exciting.

It’s a chance to join a global conversation.

Please let me know your thoughts.

Posted in Authenticity, creativity, Crowdsourcing, culture of innovation, Customer Focus, Design, Entrepreneurship 2.0, innovation, Interviews, Play, problem solving, Social Innovation, Society, The Future, The Human Person, Web 2.0, ZenStorming | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments »

Working For Peace (From a Thankful Place)

Posted by Plish on November 21, 2012

As we here in the United States get ready to celebrate Thanksgiving, we can be thankful that even with the disagreements we have, we can still go to sleep and not have to worry about missiles landing on our homes.  In other parts of the world, people aren’t as fortunate.

In the Middle East, things are particularly sensitive right now.  Nevertheless, there are those that are working for peace in the midst of turmoil.  Wednesday morning (in the US), peacemakers and educators in Israel, Gaza and Palestine will gather together in a non-violent dialogue.  You can listen and be a participant by visiting the website here.

Let’s all share from our plenty.

~peace~

 

Posted in Human Rights, innovation, Politics, problem solving, Religion, Social Innovation, Social Responsibility, Web 2.0 | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Be Part of an Amazing Worldwide Event – The Shaping the Future Global Conference

Posted by Plish on October 20, 2012

I wanted to share this amazing event that I’m going to be presenting at: The Shaping the Future Global Conference.   (I’m presenting separately and/or pulling together a panel discussion on “Innovating Educational Paradigms in the 21st Century”)  I’m attaching the latest communique on the event. If you’d like to participate, give a talk, create music for this event, feel free to check the info below or drop me a line.  Suggestions for topics are welcome!

People like Patch Adams, Deepak Chopra, and Archbishop Desmond Tutu are scheduled to give presentations.  This is not to be missed!

*******

4 Days 6 Continents 100 Nations

Multiple Time Zones

 1 Agenda: A world that works for all of us.

Dec 1,2,8,9

 

Peace Harmony Human Rights Health Education Quality of Life Environmental Sustainability Spiritual Fulfillment

 

“At a time of global deceit telling the truth is a revolutionary act.” (George Orwell)

 

Shaping the Future Global

The World is watching

www.shapingthefutureglobal.com

Shaping the Future Global

A Division of the Global Peace Centre

Melbourne, Australia

4 Days. 6 Continents. 100 Nations. 1 Agenda:

 October 18, 2012

 

Friends,

We’ve put out the word and the people have responded!

Great minds from six continents including  scientists, teachers, educators, city officials, students, artists, performing artists, social scientists, entrepreneurs of the future and people all around the world who wish to unite to create a world that works for all of us, in harmony and in justice for ALL.  We have secured amazing people such as yourself from organizations and associations from places such as Russia, Israel, Palestine, Nairobi, Cameroon, South Africa, Nepal, South Korea, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, Switzerland, Germany and the United States.  Naturally with a Presidential Election taking place in the States in a few weeks, we feel that once the elections are over we will pick up steam and Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Education, Human Rights, imagination, innovation, Social Innovation, Spirituality, Sustainability, The Future, The Human Person, Web 2.0 | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments »

Great New Tool for Collaboration (and More!) – Use a ‘Big Marker’

Posted by Plish on July 19, 2012

What do GoTo Meeting, Dropbox, and Ning have in common?

Not much really.

So, if you want to web conference, share files and create a community presence on the web, you need to subscribe to all the above services and maybe more.

Enter Big Marker.

BigMarker.com is a one-stop shop – and the majority of features are free.  Those that aren’t are very reasonably priced. And, there’s nothing to download; it’s all web-based.

Seth Godin describes a tribe as, “a group of people connected to one another, connected to a leader and connected to an idea;” it’s people with, “a shared interest and a way to communicate.”

Big Marker is essentially a tribe builder.

Public or private, project management or social widgets, educate or elucidate, Big Marker can help you innovate!

~Would love to hear your experiences using Big Marker~

Posted in Creative Thinking Techniques, culture of innovation, Disruptive Innovation, Education, innovation, Innovation Tools, Project Management, Start-Ups, Team-Building, Web 2.0 | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Infographics Need to be More than Illustrated Fact Sheets

Posted by Plish on June 2, 2012

For those who are championing innovations, inspiring dreams, or just trying to educate, a well put together infographic can be indispensable to generating an emotional, engaging and memorable response.  This is because, at their root, good infographics tell stories.  The pictures in them are worth a thousand, or more, words.

Unfortunately, the ‘graphic’ aspect of infographics, often lack depth.   Illustrations on many infographics don’t add anything and in fact, often create confusion.

What do I mean?

Two out of three people reading this will agree with me

What does the graphic above add to the text?  Nothing.  Take a gander at infographics over at Daily Infographic  and you’ll see the equivalent of the above graphic all too frequently.  Most infographics are illustrated sheets of factoids. Sure there is information being conveyed and yes, there are graphics present, but a cohesive elegance is lacking.

Here’s another example where the graphics confuse and really don’t add much to the story being told:

How can you tell if a graphic is unnecessary? The rule is simple: Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Conveying Information, Design, Information Visualization, innovation, Innovation Tools, Stories, Web 2.0 | Tagged: , , , , , , | 3 Comments »

Simulating Systems with This Intuitive (and Free!) Tool

Posted by Plish on March 8, 2012

Many years ago while working in the Rehab.-R&D wing of the Hines VA hospital, I was modelling how urinary bladders fill and empty.  The goal was to better understand what was going on so that we could design appropriate interventions.

I used a software package called TUTSIM.  It was a relatively easy to use package and it opened my eyes to the powers of system simulation.  I still do system modelling, mostly using spreadsheets.  It’s adequate, but it lacks the intuitiveness of something like TUTSIM.  I’m always on the lookout, then, for something easy to use, and yet, low-cost.

Yesterday, I came across Insight Maker.  This free, web-based simulation site fits the bill nicely.  Its self-explanatory, graphical interface enables people of all experience levels to program simulations of varying complexities.  Best of all, these simulations can be shared via the web.  This means people can change the variables and see the results for themselves.  (Yes, seeing is believing, especially when you can manipulate a model, and see how the results were reached!)

As with any software, the more extensive the support community, the more you can usually get out of the application.  Insight Maker is no exception, and thankfully there are plenty of resources. First off, you can always check out the Insight Maker Wiki .  For more extensive training, take advantage of these free webinars.

The Insight Maker website has multiple support groups, as well as premade simulations that you can tap into and use in your own simulations.

On LinkedIn? Check out the LinkedIn group on Systems Thinking (where I found out about Insight Maker) and there’s even a Systems Thinking Wiki.

So, never fear! If you get stuck with Insight Maker, there are plenty of  ‘ropes’ you can grab to pull yourself to safety.

In closing, if you’re modelling systems(biological, social or otherwise), or if you’d like to start, check out Insight Maker.  I think you’ll be excited by the possibilities.

(If you’d like to check out a simulation, here’s a classic “Predator/Prey” simulation.  Enjoy!)

Posted in Design, Information Visualization, innovation, Innovation Tools, problem solving, Service Design, Social Innovation, Web 2.0 | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Want to Share Data and Interact With it on the Web?

Posted by Plish on March 1, 2012

Well presented data tells a story.    When viewers can interact with the data, it goes beyond storytelling and encourages discussion and a search for insight into why x happened to y but not to z.

Enter Tableau Public.

This free tool (yes, free!) enables you to take data and share it on the web in visually attractive ways.  Once published, others can interact with, and ultimately, discuss it.

I’ve often struggled with elegant ways of depicting data so that others can interact with it.  I’ve tried using various Excel add-ins and websites. However, after going through the Tableau site and playing with some data depictions, this seems to fill a need that up to now has been woefully underserved.

If you’re more interested in deploying this tool in your company,  you can get that here.  It’s no longer free, but also does not appear unreasonably priced.

I have already downloaded Tableau and am looking forward to trying it out.  If you have tried it, or after you’ve tried it, I’d love to see the fruit of your labors.

In the meantime, feel free to play around with this graphic on the perils of eating undercooked food.

Posted in Conveying Information, Information Visualization, innovation, Innovation Tools, Social Innovation, Web 2.0 | Tagged: , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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