ZenStorming

Where Science Meets Muse

Posts Tagged ‘case study’

What Makes Innovations Sticky and Contagious?

Posted by Plish on December 18, 2016

wiper salute

 

As I write this, temperatures are plummeting toward -5F (-21C) tonight and a high of 1F(-17C) tomorrow, punctuated by times of high winds and snow…

Windshield wipers frozen and locked to a windshield that’s caked in ice and snow

For those who live through winters where the temperature drops below the freezing point of water, it’s a frustrating and very real problem.  I personally solve this problem by covering the windshield and wipers with a gray, black and white snow leopard patterned sheet called FrostGuard.

Others, like in the picture shown above, do something elegantly simple:  Elevate the wipers so they aren’t wedged down at the base of the windshield.  This keeps the wipers free and makes cleaning the windshields after a snow storm easier. The wipers themselves aren’t caked in ice and are more useful on the ride home.

What is fascinating, is that this phenomenon perpetuates itself.  Just a couple years ago, I seldom saw this phenomenon.  Now, drive into a parking lot with impending snow and ice, and rows of car wipers salute me!

So, why does this practice catch on?

To answer this, let’s look to Jonah Berger’s, “Contagious:Why Things Catch On.” and “Made to Stick:Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die” by Chip and Dan Heath.

Berger calls out six traits of contagious ideas:

  1. Social Currency – It makes you look cool or in the know
  2. Triggers – There are triggers in the environment that make you think about an idea
  3. Emotion – It involves emotional engagement
  4. Public – If it’s public people can see it and share
  5. Practical -Practical is better than obtuse.
  6. Stories – It’s conveyed in a story

The Heath Brothers point out these traits for sticky ideas:

  1. Simple -Has a core concept
  2. Unexpected – It surprises people
  3. Concrete – An idea can be grasped and remembered later
  4. Credible – It’s believable
  5. Emotional – Engages people
  6. Stories – It’s conveyed in a story

The elevated Windshield Wipers hit multiple points

  • Simple – Lift wipers to make your Post Storm Windshield Cleanup  (PSWC) easier
  • Social Currency – Dude, I know how to make the PSWC. Am I cool or what?
  • Unexpected -Whoa, check out the wipers standing in the rows of cars!
  • Triggers – It’s going to snow while I’m in the office (or shopping center, or…). Time to do something about it now so I don’t pay for it later.
  • Concrete – Just lift the wipers. How easy is that?
  • Emotion – We’ve all felt biting winds and frozen body parts while scraping ice off of windshields and cursed under our breaths when the wipers don’t clean the windows, even after we’ve sprayed a ton of wiper fluid!
  • Credible – Makes total sense to lift the wipers
  • Public – It’s in parking lots everywhere
  • Practical – In other words: easy to practice
  • Stories – This whole post is talking about this concept.  But the real story is told each time someone walks into a parking lot: Once upon a time,  a winter storm was coming.  As you exit your car after parking, you see multiple cars with wipers proudly standing perpendicular.  You go into the office.  Meanwhile, snows came and they were terrible!  When it’s time to leave, you’re greeted by a blast of arctic as you walk into the parking lot.  While you and others get frost bit, and curse over howling winds while cleaning your windshields, Wiper People spend less time in the cold, and are actually able to see out their windshields on the drive home.  And they lived happily ever after!

What’s the moral of the story?

Innovations get adopted when people’s paths cross.  And they need to be sticky and contagious.  Put them out there so they’re easy to try.  The best ones end up letting you see the world and yourself a little more clearly. 😉

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Posted in Case Studies, Design, innovation, Innovation Tools, Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Talking Hearts and Other Parts

Posted by Plish on February 4, 2014

Every once in a while someone takes a technology and uses it in a slightly different way than usual.  A friend of mine who I used to work with way back when, shared just such a twist to a technology using the Livescribe Echo Smartpen.

Dr. Mike is an Instructor and Director of the Multi-Function Lab at Loyola Medical Center, and he always looks for ways to use technology in ways that make education more effective and accessible.  In this case, he was looking for a way to make education about the human body less dependent upon instructors and yet, more robust – embalming fluids and med students make for a quite a volatile mix.  In particular, he was looking for a way to label anatomical models and parts of cadavers.

A while back there was talk of QR codes or other techs,  but eventually he went the route of using a Livescribe pen and markers.  Here’s a little video he put together showing how the technology works.  I love what he did thinking outside ‘the box.’ But then, thinking in novel ways was never a weak point of Dr. Dauzvardis.

 

What do you think of this concept?

Posted in Case Studies, creativity, Design, Education, innovation, problem solving | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

When Designers Don’t Really Pay Attention to the Customer – A Case Study of a Humidifier

Posted by Plish on December 15, 2010

I recently bought a Sunbeam room humidifier.  Over all I like it’s look and the various displays.  Then I went to fill up the tank… 

I exaggerated slightly to make my point, but  I think you can see what the problem is.  The fill hole for the tank is placed away from the edges.  As a result, I can’t set the tank down in the tub as it’s filling.  (I can, but 50+% of the water splashes off and goes down the drain.) Instead, I have to hold the tank at an uncomfortable angle while it’s filling and getting heavier.  On top of that, it’s hard to know if I’ve filled it enough since everything is tipped.

Before I got too angry, I looked at the instruction booklet to see what they recommended and  it clearly said the tank could be refilled in  the sink or tub.    Now, to be fair, I did check to see if it fit in my kitchen sink and it did – barely.    But, sinks often have things in them and they don’t deliver a good volume of water – it takes forever to fill up a tank.  

 Tubs, on the other hand,  give nice large volumes of water.   Without doing a study, I couldn’t say that more people use the tub than the sink, but I’d be willing to bet they do.

So what does this all mean?

It probably means that the designers of this product didn’t take the time to actually watch people in their homes filling their humidifiers.   If they did, they would have noticed the contortioning that people do while filling up their humidifier tanks.  To be fair, maybe this was done on purpose so that  people wouldn’t overfill the tanks.  Or, maybe they didn’t go to people’s homes because they measured 100 different faucets and designed for the average and it turns out that mine is an outlier – 99% of all faucets fit but mine doesn’t.  

Regardless, this all comes down to the simple question,

“Why does this even have to happen?” 

Moving the fill hole an inch closer to the closest straight edge would enable this to be used in all types of tubs. 

People could just walk into the bathroom, plunk the tank down, watch the water gush through the hole with minimal splashing (and thus not require major wiping afterwards), turn off the water, screw the lid on and pick up the tank.  It would’ve made for a simple, stress free, tank filling process. 

Is the current situation a huge dealbreaker?  Probably not.  I already bought it and it’s not worth taking it back to the store.  But, in the end, if someone asks me about a room humidifier, while I’d probably still recommend this model, I would share the info on filling because it’s an inconvenience and mess that I’d want to be upfront about.  It’s a shame really because it wouldn’t have taken much to make this product rock solid…

It’s a simple lesson really:   A better customer experience doesn’t necessarily come from flashy numbers, cool dials, smooth, beautiful lines.    Sometimes it comes from just paying attention to what the customer does.

Posted in Case Studies, Customer Focus, Design, Ergonomics, Market Assessment, Research | Tagged: , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

 
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