ZenStorming

Where Science Meets Muse

Posts Tagged ‘entrepreneurs’

Innovation Proposes, You Say “Yes” – Can All Parties Make This Critical Shift in Perspective?

Posted by Plish on May 25, 2018

 

Innovations occur at the intersections

 

As I walked into the Earthly Goods health food store I noticed the neighbors and immediately thought,  ” Wow, Bath and Body Works, Nothing Bundt Cakes and Earthly Goods.  There are some dynamite opportunities just waiting to happen, if….”

If What?

If the parties involved have enough courage to create a working relationship and even more courage to develop new processes that leverage all parties’ strengths. In my experience, the latter is where most cooperative ventures grind to a halt.

Creating a relationship seems to be the easy part. 

Someone comes up with a great idea that has one missing piece.  After a little digging, a partner is found to provide that piece and the excitement is palpable.  The first prototypes are made that successfully leverage both companies’ competencies and there’s even more excitement!! And then…

Who’s going to deal with the problems if they pop up?

Do we handle it ourselves or let them handle it?

All of a sudden people forget why the venture was started in the first place.

We can’t let them handle it.  We’ve always handled that part of the business! 

The doubt and insecurity take over.

The products, the deal, the relationship loses its luster and nothing happens…

For there to be success, parties need to realize they’re a tertium quid, at least at the start.

The partnership results in something new that is neither company and yet both companies.  Once a new relationship is formed, both parties need to be willing to re-write the rule book and then play by the new rules.

Accept that, and beautiful things will happen.

So let’s assume that the parties shown in the picture can find a way to work together.  What creations would you like to see created out of those relationships?  I like the response posted on the ZenStorming™ Facebook page:

Beginnings

 

 

 

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Posted in Design, Entrepreneurship, innovation, Innovation Tools, product design, Service Design, Uncategorized, ZenStorming | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Want to Harness the Power of “We”? Innovation Starts with “I”

Posted by Plish on March 3, 2014

People like to point to the fact that Thomas Edison had an entire innovation factory working for him, that innovation was a team effort.  While this is true in general, the deeper truth is that Edison was an entrepreneur.  He had to get the ball rolling.  At the beginning, the ideas were his, the dreams were his, the innovation factory was his baby.  He worked to make things happen.  Even in the context of the “We” of his facility in Menlo Park, there were commitments from each individual employed there.

Innovation starts with “I”.  It starts in the heart; it starts with an individual commitment, an individual work ethic. Before it can become a communal effort it needs to be an individual dream. Innovation has entrepreneurial roots.  When individuals come together with common goals, empowered to make dreams reality, when they’re given freedom to experiment, to be creative, to try, fail, learn and grow, when people are rewarded either intrinsically or extrinsically, then “We” means something.  Until then, it’s simply a word used in the context of stirring political, and corporate, pep rallies.

Please don’t misunderstand me. “We” is powerful.  But it’s only powerful if the following criteria are met:

  1. Everyone being called, “We”, must consider themselves part of “We.” (If I say you’re part of a Tribe, you need to agree.)
  2. Anyone saying, “We”, must be acknowledged as part of “We”. (If you say you’re part of a Tribe, I need to agree.)
  3. “We” must all believe in the same goals and means to accomplish those goals.  (Each individual agrees to certain roles.)
  4. Each individual receives a reward for contributing to “We”.
  5. Each individual must be empowered to act in ways that helps accomplish the goals of “We”.
  6. “We” does not turn against the individual.  “We” respects the individual.  As such, “We” respects, and needs, diversity – especially in the context of innovation.

“We”, paradoxically, is fragile. If all 6 of the above criteria are not met, especially the first 3, there is no “We”.   Strictly speaking, we is a virtual entity – it only exists when the above 6 criteria are met.  Saying “We can do this! We can change this!” while perhaps inspiring,  provides no direction.

On the other hand, “I” does not have the pre-requisites above.  It is powerful and strong.  Yes, there may be circumstances that hinder innovation.  But, in the end, it’s about digging deep and finding a way.

“The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; because there is not effort without error and shortcomings; but who does actually strive to do the deed; who knows the great enthusiasm, the great devotion, who spends himself in a worthy cause, who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement and who at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly. So that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat.” -Theodore Roosevelt

So, how do we create “We”?

Address the needs of, inspire and empower, the individual.  Let people be “I”.  Let people be authentic, let them be true to themselves.  People are social creatures, they leverage relationships naturally when given opportunities.  “We” – Tribes – form somewhat spontaneously where individuals blossom.

You are change!

Make a difference in your own life, in your family, in your community!

The ripples will build upon themselves, and the “We” that’s formed will be even more powerful.

Innovation starts with “I”.

Posted in culture of innovation, Design, Entrepreneurship 2.0, innovation, Politics, Team-Building, The Human Person, Workplace Creativity | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Goooooooooooal!!! An Innovation that Impacts Life Beyond the Soccer Field

Posted by Plish on June 7, 2012

Soccer is a sport that’s loved worldwide (where it’s often known as futbol/football/kickball). Just like this image I took when I was in Ukraine a few years back (which is co-hosting the Euro Cup this year), scenes like this one are playing out all over the world, even in countries that have crippling economic hardships. 

Being the son of Ukrainian born parents and living next door to folks born in Germany, I was playing soccer  early in life (long before “Soccer Mom” was even a phrase) and later played in Chicago’s Semi-Pro leagues.   I could never figure out why soccer wasn’t more common among my peers here in the US.   It’s a sport that is easy to outfit. All you need is a ball and somewhere to kick it.  And, like the above picture shows, the space doesn’t even need to be grass-covered.

So when I saw this innovation, I was blown away.

It’s all about the ball.

These two entrepreneurs hatched this brilliant idea as part of an ‘engineering for non-engineers’ class.  Check out the video.

 

Leveraging things you wouldn’t normally connect (that’s the key to great innovations!) – soccer and the need for energy in parts of the world that don’t have easy access to it – this amazing and fun innovation was born.

In this age of “There’s an app for that”, it truly is refreshing to see a fun innovation that fits so seamlessly into kids daily lives and provides a benefit going well beyond those that exercise provides.   And, if you donate one of these balls, you don’t just contribute to the well-being of kids, you contribute to the well-being of the communities they belong to.

Well done!!!

Posted in children, Customer Focus, Design, games, innovation, Play, Social Innovation, Sports Creativity, Start-Ups, Sustainable Technology, toys, Wellness | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

G.R.A.S.P. The Solution – A Book Review

Posted by Plish on February 22, 2012

I had the privilege of recently reading the book,  Grasp the Solution: How to Find the Best Answers to Everyday Challenges , by Chris Griffiths with Melina Costi.

G.R.A.S.P. stands for the various stages and types of thinking:

G-Generative

R-Reactive

A-Analytical

S-Selective

P-Proactive

In general, the book takes an in-depth look at the above thinking processes and couples them with a method called the “The Solution Finder”.  When used in tandem, they provide a scaffold for finding creative solutions.

While the book is dedicated to the explanation of GRASP and the Solution Finder, the authors state that there’s one thing that they hope readers take away from the book: It’s that they start thinking about thinking.

Without doubt, this book will get you pondering about how you think.  However, if you think thinking about thinking is difficult to do, perhaps it’s even more difficult to write about.

Therein lies the one negative about this book – the authors’ discussion of a recursive process can, at times, be difficult to follow.

However, there are many positives to this book and I consider it a welcome addition to any entrepreneur/innovator’s bookshelf.  I particularly was impressed with the various tools discussed as they are clearly and concisely explained.

By the authors’ own admission, there’s not really anything new, per se, in this book.  What they have done, however,  is provide a cogent methodology for creative thinking and compiled and explained the tools/resources that support it.  This is no small feat and should be commended.  (Also, if you’re a newbie to mind-mapping this book gives a quick but, as with the other tools, utterly thorough primer.)

Overall, I give this book a ‘thumbs up’ and recommend that you give it a read.

If you do, please drop me a line, or post your thoughts here.  I’d love to hear what you think.

Posted in Books, Creative Thinking Techniques, innovation, Innovation Tools, Mind Maps, problem solving | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments »

Want to build an Entrepreneurial mindset? Look to INDIE Artists

Posted by Plish on August 14, 2011

There is a growing consensus that when building a successful, thriving, innovative culture, it’s essential that people adopt the mentalities of entrepreneurs.   While there are many different facets, Bob Baker over at The Buzz Factor has summarized them nicely in this great article  (it’s worth reading to understand the nuances of what being INDIE means). 

In summary, people should be:

I – Inspired

N – Nontraditional

D – Determined

I – Innovative

E – Empowered

Adopt these perspectives and foster them in those around you and, trust me, the sky will be the limit.

Posted in Authenticity, creativity, Entrepreneurship 2.0, innovation, Musical Creativity, Start-Ups, The Human Person, Workplace Creativity | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

In the Medical Device Industry? – Check Out Knobbe Medical Device Group

Posted by Plish on July 28, 2011

Are you a medical device start-up?

If not, are you looking for:

– news about medical device companies?

– medical device oriented conferences in your area?

– legal insights into the world of medical devices?

– suppliers, manufacturers and consultants that know their way around the medical device industry?

If you answered “yes” to any of the above then check out KnobbeMedical.

Started by the Intellectual Property attorneys of Knobbe Martens, the website is a great resource for those in the medical device industry.

Personally, I’m impressed with the depth and breadth of the information that’s available. If there is anything negative about the site it’s that the page design isn’t overly friendly.  There is so much information that it can be somewhat laborious to drill down to get the information you need. 

Nevertheless, don’t let that discourage you.  It’s well worth spending some time at the Knobbe Medical site.

Posted in culture of innovation, Design, Entrepreneurship 2.0, Funding Innovation, innovation, Medical Devices, patents, Start-Ups | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Guy Kawasaki and the Art of Innovation

Posted by Plish on July 8, 2009

Found this great video over at Joe Lafferty’s blog.

Guy’s ten points are:

1. Make meaning

2. Make a mantra (not a mission statement)

3. Jump to the next curve

4. Roll the dice

5. Don’t worry, be crappy

6. Let 100 flowers blossom

7. Polarize people

8. Churn, baby, churn

9. Follow the 10-20-30 rule

10. Don’t let the bozos get you down

I like them all and I think most bigger companies have problems with #3.

What are your thoughts?

Posted in culture of innovation, Design, Disruptive Innovation, Guy Kawasaki, innovation | Tagged: , , | Leave a Comment »

Recognizing Innovation When It Lights Your Night

Posted by Plish on December 30, 2008

Santa's Innovation Partner

Santa's Innovation Partner

When people (or reindeer) have the solution to a problem, the more radical and out of the ordinary the solution, an odd thing happens — The idea, and often the idea generator,  get scoffed at and mocked. 

It takes a leader with great fortitude and an entrepreneurial spirit to spot these creative gems and give them the chance they deserve.  This article by Jacqueline Byrd, author of The Innovation Equation, uses the example of Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer to highlight the need for people to have the insight of Santa as he recognized the value of Rudolph’s nose. 

People often struggle to come up with the next great idea, but perhaps an equal challenge is to recognize other ideas, and people, as having their own unique brilliance–just like the brilliance of a reindeer’s nose.

Posted in Authenticity, Creativity Leadership, culture of innovation, innovation, Nature of Creativity, The Human Person, Workplace Creativity | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Check Out These Online Innovation Tools

Posted by Plish on November 18, 2008

The folks over at Open Innovators have created this excellent guide to online innovation and entrepreneurship.  I’ve touched on some of these briefly but they break down the entire process, step by step with the associated resources.  Bookmark it or print it out. I’ve already cross-referenced this multiple times. 

It does help to remind ourselves though that there are great resources out there, especially for prototyping, moldbuilding, etc., that might not be web-based per se, but have excellent response times and the price for their services is excellent.

Posted in Entrepreneurship 2.0, innovation, Innovation Tools, Traditional Brainstorming, Web 2.0, ZenStorming | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Five Ways to Get Employees Thinking Like Entrepreneurs

Posted by Plish on October 7, 2008

Interesting blog post from the Wall Street Journal. 

I have seen industry violate one or more of the above ways time and time again. It is difficult in most of today’s corporate cultures to reward risk because risk is often tied directly into the pending rewards that have already been dialed-in to short term and often long term plans. This means that failure, which should be embraced and learned from in an entrepreneurial company, becomes the enemy and people get various levels of punishment instead of reward for creative thinking.  How have you seen these followed or violated?

Posted in Creativity Leadership, idea generation, Workplace Creativity | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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