Where Science Meets Muse

Posts Tagged ‘future’

Are You Innovating for This Shifting Healthcare Paradigm?

Posted by Plish on October 17, 2017

Michael Plishka Midwest Sensors

Michael Plishka speaking at the 2017 Midwest Sensors Conference

A little over a week ago I gave a talk at the Midwest Sensors Conference entitled: Sensor-Driven Healthcare: Innovative Applications Today & Tomorrow.  Besides being a lot of fun, it was great to be able to share my perspectives on the directions of cutting edge of healthcare which is being made possible by the explosion of newer sensor technologies.

But…sensors are more than hardware

Too often people think of sensors as these little pieces of electronics.  The fact is, sensors are part of an entire complex – an ecosystem if you will.  If you take the entire ecosystem into account when designing products, or at least leverage the relationships in the ecosystem, your products will be more innovative and be better able to make a splash.  So what does that ecosystem look like?

Changing paradigms – from Clinician Centered to Patient Centered and beyond

In the current Clinician Centered Paradigm (below), all sensor output, the results of all the tests flows to the Clinician and the Clinician then curates the information and shares it with the patient.  This makes the patient dependent upon the Clinician.  There is some flow back and forth, but the ‘behind the scenes’ information flows through the Clinician.

Clinician Centered Paradigm

Clinician Centered Paradigm

In the currently emerging Patient Centered Paradigm,  increasing accessibility to, and popularity of, sensor technology has created a means to reverse the flow of information, and give more power to the patient.

Patient Centered Paradigm

Patient Centered Paradigm

While the Clinician can still have the same role as the old paradigm (shown in purple), the new paradigm can bypass the Clinician entirely.   Patients can get information about themselves through various sensor technologies, and they can share what they want, when they want, with the Clinician.  Patients are the curators of their health information. The take-away here is that the Clinician isn’t driving data acquisition – Patients are.  So, any products that make the process of obtaining information, deciphering it and communicating it both to Patients, and perhaps to Clinicians, will be ahead of the game.

There’s a New Game afoot

A newer paradigm is emerging simultaneously with the Patient Centered Paradigm.  This paradigm can push the Clinician even further to the fringes of Patient health.


With the growth Artificial Intelligence (AI).


The Future “Patient Centered Plus” Paradigm

This paradigm, the “Patient Centered Plus” Paradigm, brings Artificial-Intelligence/Deep-Learning into the mix.  This technology can take the results of millions of tests and tease out patterns that Clinicians most likely wouldn’t see.  As the outputs from these sensors get stored, sifted through, and analyzed, new insights into data will become apparent through the use of Artificial Intelligence.  Armed with this information, Patients will approach Clinicians (if they so desire) with a specific likely diagnosis, and the Clinician will then have to figure out a treatment.

Is the Clinician even needed?

In reality, yes.  There is a depth of expertise that Clinicians have that Patients won’t.  Not to mention they still have surgical expertise as well as the ability to order more in-depth tests and treatments.  However, Patients could well have a perception that Clinicians are not necessary, and in so doing, miss valuable input into their healthcare.  This could result in Clinicians being brought into the mix ‘too late in the game’ to do any good.

Clinicians need to adjust as well

There needs to be a shift in how Clinicians approach the relationship between technology and the Patient. (It goes without saying that Medical Schools will need to change their approaches to optimize the educational process in light of AI and a Patient Centered Paradigm.)  There needs to be a way to make sure that Clinicians can be a meaningful link in the Patient Centered Paradigm. But, this can’t be made possible if Clinicians cling to the old paradigm.

So where’s the danger?

There is the potential to create a divide between the Patient and Clinician.  Now that Patients are becoming more aware of, and acting upon, their new found freedom of access to their own health data through new sensor techs, removing that freedom won’t be a palatable solution.  However, leaving the Clinician entirely out of the loop is not a wise approach either.

The solution is ‘both/and’

Newer products and services should find ways of bringing the Clinician into the picture (as needed) without alienating the Patient by taking away autonomy.  It ultimately needs to be a team approach.  Sensor technologies, and in fact, all technology in Healthcare, needs to play within the newer emerging relational paradigms.  A return to a Clinician Centered paradigm is neither wise or prudent.

So where are the innovative products?

In short, take a look at the emerging paradigms above.  You can focus on the nodes, or perhaps more powerfully, focus on the verbs, the actions, the connections between the nodes.  Optimizing them has the most potential to improve the patient experience.

What do you think about these paradigms? 

Where should innovators be focusing their energies?






Posted in Healthcare, innovation, Technology, Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Giving Thanks, Changing the World and the Sacred Time Paradox

Posted by Plish on December 1, 2013

I wrote before on the Sacred Space Paradox.  The paradox is that as we set aside certain spaces like nature preserves and designate them ‘sacred’, by default we say that the rest of the world isn’t sacred in the same way.  As a result, instead of treating the entire world as a nature preserve, we relegate certain areas to ‘museum-esque’ status – meant to be interacted with in very controlled manners.

The corollary to the Sacred Space Paradox, is the Sacred Time Paradox.  We designate certain times as sacred and hence we behave in a certain manner in those times, but as a result, we de facto act in different ways during those ‘profane’ (not sacred) times.


That special day in the year when we give thanks for all we have.  We give thanks for the bounty of harvest, for friends and family (and I am especially thankful for you, the reader!)  It is a time for togetherness and sharing.

So why do we make a point to be thankful but once a year? Is there anything that we do on Thanksgiving that we shouldn’t be doing every day?  Don’t get me wrong, it’s a good thing to have a communal holiday that highlights giving thanks (at least in the ideal.)  But it’s important to be cognizant of the Sacred Time Paradox so that we can create a better world.

This weekend while relaxing post dinner, I came across this little blurb from Dear Abby in the local paper:

WP_20131129_001 (2)

Irrespective of the religious tone, each one of the lines is a great reminder of what it means to be truly thankful for something.  It’s not just about remembering, but about service and designing and innovating for others, to make their lives better.

That’s why I’m also including my “Thankfulness Process“.  I developed this flow chart to help us better understand what we’re thankful for and help us ponder ways in which we can transform that thankfulness into action.


Let’s make a point to not fall too deeply into the Sacred Time Paradox.  Let’s reflect on what we’re thankful for more often, and more importantly, let’s use that thankfulness as an impetus to be more, and do more good, in this world.

Today, and every day, try and spend a few moments being thankful.  Not only can it help you be healthier, my wish for you is that it empowers you to create a better world for those less fortunate.

Happy Thanksgiving!

Posted in culture of innovation, Design, innovation, Philosophy, Social Innovation, The Future | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Innovation, Design and the “Crafting the Future” Conference

Posted by Plish on April 9, 2013

If you’re interested in some great perspectives on design, innovation, craft, social change and the interplay of all these and more, check out the webpage from the Crafting the Future conference, running April 17th thru 19th in Gothenburg.  In particular, head over to the Papers section.  There you will find a plethora of research on the following topics:

1. Designing Future Mobility
2. Design Development of Future Homes for Future Cities
3. Design and Innovation
4. MAKING TOGETHER – Open, Connected, Collaborative
5. The craft of design in design of service
6. Fashion Design for Sustainability
7. Design history as a tool for better design
8. Power to the People: Practices of Empowerment through Craft
9. Design & Craft (Crafting the Education of Design)
10. Open Track

I’m amazed by the volume of wonderful work.  Pick your research track and dive in!

Oh, if anyone reading this is going to the conference, I would love to hear your thoughts!!


Posted in Co-Creation, culture of innovation, Design, Fashion, innovation, problem solving, Service Design, Social Innovation, Sustainability, The Future | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

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