ZenStorming

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Posts Tagged ‘government innovation’

Innovating a Nation – Happy 4th of July!

Posted by Plish on July 4, 2012

The Original Declaration. Click to go the National Archive to learn more.

When people talk of innovations, they speak of business models, products and services.  In the United States, people forget that we areable to be an innovative society because of a great innovation in the governmental realm:

A  new type of government formed by the people, to secure their rights to, “…Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness.”

Thanks to the chutzpah of the Founding Fathers (they were speaking treason after all) we are the inheritors of one heck of an innovation.

They saw the situation, knew it needed to be changed, and did something about it. They put their lives and livelihoods on the line.  They collaborated to come up with a statement of purpose and followed up relentlessly until their dream became reality in, and through, the US Constitution.

This was innovation!

Thank you to all the following who pledged their ‘Lives, Fortunes and Sacred Honor’ in signing the Declaration of Independence (which you can read by clicking on the link)

Josiah Bartlett, William Whipple, Matthew Thornton, John Hancock, Samuel Adams, John Adams, Robert Treat Paine, Elbridge Gerry,  Stephen Hopkins, William Ellery, Roger Sherman, Samuel Huntington, William Williams, Oliver Wolcott, William Floyd, Philip Livingston, Francis Lewis, Lewis Morris, Richard Stockton, John Witherspoon, Francis Hopkinson, John Hart, Abraham Clark, Robert Morris, Benjamin Rush, Benjamin Franklin, John Morton, George Clymer, James Smith, George Taylor, James Wilson, George Ross, Caesar Rodney, George Read, Thomas McKean, Samuel Chase, William Paca, Thomas Stone, Charles Carroll of Carrollton, George Wythe, Richard Henry Lee, Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Harrison, Thomas Nelson, Jr., Francis Lightfoot Lee, Carter Braxton, William Hooper, Joseph Hewes, John Penn South.   Edward Rutledge, Thomas Heyward, Jr., Thomas Lynch, Jr., Arthur Middleton, Button Gwinnett, Lyman Hall, George Walton

Thank you to all those that have worked and fought to keep this nation and her people, free and able to be, a nation of innovation!

Happy Birthday, United States!

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Posted in Design, Human Rights, innovation, Politics, Social Innovation, Society, The Human Person | Tagged: , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

10 Suggestions for Getting Healthcare Discussions on Track – We Need Politicians to Be Innovative!

Posted by Plish on August 18, 2009

 

Healthcarewneweyesa michaelplishka2009We hear politicians speak of innovation yet they fail to live innovation themselves; they fail to find creative ways of working together to make the healthcare of this country better, of designing systems of healthcare that meet the needs of the most (that incidentally cover the politicians as well as the people) in the most sustainable ways possible.  Oh, as a point of clarification, the status quo is also not sustainable so it is not a solution.

To that end here are some suggestions for getting the healthcare debate on the right track:

1. Hold brainstorming meetings on Capital Hill with bipartisan groups.  One condition exists: NONE of the proposals thus far penned are allowed in the discussions. (I’ll be happy to moderate)

2. All legislators are required to work for one month minimum finding ways of meeting the needs of the constituencies on the other side of the aisle.

3. Instead of reinventing the entire system, find the gaps in the current healthcare system and fill those.  One way to find the gaps is to write an obituary for 5 years down the road for the US and its healthcare situation.  Chances are the things that bring about our demise are due to gaps of some type.

4.  The 102 Idea webpage in Illinois is something that every State should be implementing.  Ideally though it should be bi-partisan.  Rule #1 on those pages: NO Complaining about a situation or about what others are doing.  Rule #2:  No patting your Party on the back.

5. Create a list of the best things that other Countries and States do related to healthcare. Combine them to create something new.

6. Create a list of the best programs in other States/Countries not related to healthcare.  What can be learned from these programs and applied directly or modified to the healthcare situation in the US?

7.  How would a poor Third World Country solve our healthcare crisis? Use this exercise to generate ideas.

8. Create a list of the strengths and weaknesses in our current system.  Come up with solutions that maximize the strengths and minimize the weaknesses.

9. Create a list of the facts regarding healthcare and stick to these at all times.  An orthopedic surgeon does not make $40,000 per procedure to amputate a foot.

10. Last but not least, the beginning of the solution: Agree on a problem statement.  The problem statement is not: “Health care is running us into the ground,” or “Insurance companies are making too much money.”  A working problem statement invites solutions; they are phrased positively as in: “In what ways might we….” 

It might also help to keep in mind what John F. Kennedy said: “Let us not seek the Republican answer or the Democratic answer, but the right answer. Let us not seek to fix the blame for the past. Let us accept our own responsibility for the future.”

Let’s get to work!

Posted in creativity, Crowdsourcing, culture of innovation, Design, Health Concerns, Human Rights, idea generation, imagination, innovation, Politics, problem solving, Sustainable Technology, Traditional Brainstorming, ZenStorming | Tagged: , , , , | 3 Comments »

 
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