ZenStorming

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Posts Tagged ‘Trends’

Are You Innovating for This Shifting Healthcare Paradigm?

Posted by Plish on October 17, 2017

Michael Plishka Midwest Sensors

Michael Plishka speaking at the 2017 Midwest Sensors Conference

A little over a week ago I gave a talk at the Midwest Sensors Conference entitled: Sensor-Driven Healthcare: Innovative Applications Today & Tomorrow.  Besides being a lot of fun, it was great to be able to share my perspectives on the directions of cutting edge of healthcare which is being made possible by the explosion of newer sensor technologies.

But…sensors are more than hardware

Too often people think of sensors as these little pieces of electronics.  The fact is, sensors are part of an entire complex – an ecosystem if you will.  If you take the entire ecosystem into account when designing products, or at least leverage the relationships in the ecosystem, your products will be more innovative and be better able to make a splash.  So what does that ecosystem look like?

Changing paradigms – from Clinician Centered to Patient Centered and beyond

In the current Clinician Centered Paradigm (below), all sensor output, the results of all the tests flows to the Clinician and the Clinician then curates the information and shares it with the patient.  This makes the patient dependent upon the Clinician.  There is some flow back and forth, but the ‘behind the scenes’ information flows through the Clinician.

Clinician Centered Paradigm

Clinician Centered Paradigm

In the currently emerging Patient Centered Paradigm,  increasing accessibility to, and popularity of, sensor technology has created a means to reverse the flow of information, and give more power to the patient.

Patient Centered Paradigm

Patient Centered Paradigm

While the Clinician can still have the same role as the old paradigm (shown in purple), the new paradigm can bypass the Clinician entirely.   Patients can get information about themselves through various sensor technologies, and they can share what they want, when they want, with the Clinician.  Patients are the curators of their health information. The take-away here is that the Clinician isn’t driving data acquisition – Patients are.  So, any products that make the process of obtaining information, deciphering it and communicating it both to Patients, and perhaps to Clinicians, will be ahead of the game.

There’s a New Game afoot

A newer paradigm is emerging simultaneously with the Patient Centered Paradigm.  This paradigm can push the Clinician even further to the fringes of Patient health.

How?

With the growth Artificial Intelligence (AI).

future

The Future “Patient Centered Plus” Paradigm

This paradigm, the “Patient Centered Plus” Paradigm, brings Artificial-Intelligence/Deep-Learning into the mix.  This technology can take the results of millions of tests and tease out patterns that Clinicians most likely wouldn’t see.  As the outputs from these sensors get stored, sifted through, and analyzed, new insights into data will become apparent through the use of Artificial Intelligence.  Armed with this information, Patients will approach Clinicians (if they so desire) with a specific likely diagnosis, and the Clinician will then have to figure out a treatment.

Is the Clinician even needed?

In reality, yes.  There is a depth of expertise that Clinicians have that Patients won’t.  Not to mention they still have surgical expertise as well as the ability to order more in-depth tests and treatments.  However, Patients could well have a perception that Clinicians are not necessary, and in so doing, miss valuable input into their healthcare.  This could result in Clinicians being brought into the mix ‘too late in the game’ to do any good.

Clinicians need to adjust as well

There needs to be a shift in how Clinicians approach the relationship between technology and the Patient. (It goes without saying that Medical Schools will need to change their approaches to optimize the educational process in light of AI and a Patient Centered Paradigm.)  There needs to be a way to make sure that Clinicians can be a meaningful link in the Patient Centered Paradigm. But, this can’t be made possible if Clinicians cling to the old paradigm.

So where’s the danger?

There is the potential to create a divide between the Patient and Clinician.  Now that Patients are becoming more aware of, and acting upon, their new found freedom of access to their own health data through new sensor techs, removing that freedom won’t be a palatable solution.  However, leaving the Clinician entirely out of the loop is not a wise approach either.

The solution is ‘both/and’

Newer products and services should find ways of bringing the Clinician into the picture (as needed) without alienating the Patient by taking away autonomy.  It ultimately needs to be a team approach.  Sensor technologies, and in fact, all technology in Healthcare, needs to play within the newer emerging relational paradigms.  A return to a Clinician Centered paradigm is neither wise or prudent.

So where are the innovative products?

In short, take a look at the emerging paradigms above.  You can focus on the nodes, or perhaps more powerfully, focus on the verbs, the actions, the connections between the nodes.  Optimizing them has the most potential to improve the patient experience.

What do you think about these paradigms? 

Where should innovators be focusing their energies?

 

 

 

 

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Posted in Healthcare, innovation, Technology, Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Are you Using This Simple 3 Step Process to Create Products that Leverage Existing Trends?

Posted by Plish on August 9, 2016

There’s no question that we are living in exciting times.  There are multiple trends, technological and otherwise, that are blossoming and can be leveraged if you take the time to put in some work.  Follow this simple three step process and you’ll be much better equipped for leveraging the power of trends in your business.

Step One:

Research and understand trends that are shaping the landscape.

As a primer, here’s a quick list of some trends that are shaping the world right now.

 

Via MarketWatch

  • Virtual and Augmented Reality
  • Wearables
  • Smart Cars
  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Drones
  • Phone (and batteries) That Charge at a Distance

Some other Consumer Retail Trends:

  • Leveraging the Crowd
  • Subscription Services (Dollar Shave Club)
  • 3-D Printing
  • Maker Movement
  • Product Personalization
  • Sharing Economy
  • Uberization (I agree with Fast Company. Uber isn’t Sharing Economy but it is a new model)
  • Multiple Platform Sales
  • Social Media and Online Communities
  • Preference for Ethically Responsible Brands
  • Eco-Awareness
  • Product Co-Creation
  • Increased Biometric Use

Also check out Trendhunter (where I contribute from time to time 😉 ) Trendwatching, and Cassandra with their Cassandra Daily Newsletter.  The trends on these sites can be quite provocative and are great for jump-starting creative thoughts.

Steps 2 and 3!

2.  List the main positive and negative attributes of your product.

3.  Look for intersections between your product attributes and the trends and create products that enhance the positives or negate the negatives

For example.  Let’s say that your company makes paper-based notebooks.

Positive Attributes: Convenient; Creates hard copy; Can be used with various media (pen, pencil, paint, crayon, etc.);  Highly secure; Can be digitally copied (copy machine, phone picture, etc.); Difficult to forge; Low-cost; Recyclable; Personal

Negative Attributes: Needs to be on hand to use; Must do additional work to digitally archive; Uses/wastes paper; If recycled then must be copied; Have to purchase at stores either in bulk or as needed but then have to run to the store; ???

 

Ideas:

  • Have a QR code 10 pages from the end of the notebook that automatically orders (when scanned) more notebooks before running out (Better than a subscription service because it’s on-demand) This data can be used to then understand ordering patterns.
  • Enable customization of notebooks (paper designs -lined/graph/etc, covers, etc.) via online portal or app
  • Have a sensor embedded 10-20 pages from the end that when written on automatically purchases another notebook and mails it
  • Use non-wood pulp papers
  • Create an online community where people can design notebook covers for each other
  • Deliver notebooks by drone
  • Create notebooks from text messages
  • Create an augmented reality app that enables someone to ‘write’ on various products/locations/etc. to capture ideas virtually
  • Create a wearable that can tell what you’re writing and store it digitally, automatically
  • Provide notebooks that are customized for online courses and heighten student interactivity
  • Notebook covers contain solar panels and/or batteries for recharging digital devices.  These can also be charged via movement/carrying.
  • Use biometrics to lock/unlock paper notebooks
  • Create luxury notebooks
  • Personalize notebooks with a chamber that contains a friend/family member’s DNA from a kiss (think lipstick on an envelope…remember snail mail? 😉 )
  • Create Notebooks from pulp made from trees or branches that grew on property that held emotional import
  • Grow bamboo (at home?) or more likely,   you pay an amount to lease a portion of a bamboo field from which pulp is harvested to create your own notebooks. It’s a notebook/paper co-op (I LOVE this idea.  Anyone that wants to do it, please contact me 🙂 )

As you can see, just by bouncing notebook attributes against the various trends, I came up with 16 ideas for new products.  (Not only does this process supplement existing product lines, but you can use it to create brand new markets.  Just start with some existing product line attributes, bounce it against trends and create new products irrespective of what your industry is!)

There’s no excuse for being left in the dust of technology and an evolving world.  Follow this simple 3 step process, and you’ll find yourself successfully creating products as the world changes. 🙂

***

 

Here are some other tech trends for your reading enjoyment 🙂

Inc.com

  • 3d Printing
  • Active Participation in Advertising
  • Changes in Healthcare Funding
  • Reshaping Education via Online Training
  • Online Portals Reshaping Retail

Forbes

  • The Device Mesh (Connected products of all kinds)
  • Ambient User Experience (Seamless experiences spanning devices)
  • 3d Printing Materials
  • Obtaining Information from Everything
  • Advanced Machine Learning
  • Autonomous Agents and Things (Next gen Siri, Cortana, etc.)
  • Adaptive Security Architecture
  • Advanced System Architecture (Computers that function more like brains)
  • Mesh App and Service Architecture
  • Internet of Things Architecture and Platforms

A pdf Report from Deloitte touches on much of the Forbes stuff and more

 

 

 

 

Posted in 3D Printing, brainstorming, Co-Creation, Creative Thinking Techniques, culture of innovation, Disruptive Innovation, innovation, Innovation Tools, Maker Movement, problem solving, Social Responsibility, Sustainability, The Future, Trends, Uncategorized, ZenStorming | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Brand Strategy and Design – One Collective Voice at FUSE 2015

Posted by Plish on March 23, 2015

Yes, one of my favorite conferences is coming up and I hope to see you there!

FUSE 2015

From April 13-15  in Chicago, Illinois, the Loews Hotel will be home to a provocative and inspiring mix of leaders in Design, Brand Strategy, Marketing, Innovation, Trends, and Strategy.  For 3 days you will have an opportunity to learn, network and enjoy stimulating talks, workshops and more.

I always leave FUSE with a mindful of ideas and things to share.  To aid my recall, I capture my experiences of FUSE in concept maps.  You can go to Slideshare and check out my maps of DAY 1 and DAY 2 from last year.

Looking forward to seeing you there and hearing your experiences!!

Posted in Brands, creativity, Design, design thinking, innovation, Service Design, Trends | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Innovations and More from the 2014 International Home + Housewares Show

Posted by Plish on March 20, 2014

Was at one of my favorite shows earlier this week, looking for new materials and products, innovative and whimsical products, basically things that catch my fancy. What follows are some pics and vids from the show.  I also had a chance to get some insights into innovation from world class chefs, watch for those videos over the next couple of days.

One trend that was clearly present at the show was the existence of robots.  They’re everywhere.  Companies are trying to make our lives easier by creating robots to do our work for us.  I particularly liked this Window cleaning robot, the Winbot from ECOVACS.  These folks really want to bring technology into, and onto, your homes.   The best way to predict the future is to make it. ECOVACS is making it.

Also check out the Grill Bot!

Along the same lines, apps are being paired with various products and appliances.  Mostly iPhone based, but there are Android versions and Windows is gaining ground as well.

Attaches your stove temperatures and times to your smartphone

Attaches your stove temperatures to your smartphone

WP_20140318_005

Apps that Talk to your scales

WP_20140318_006

Apps that talk to blood pressure cuffs

Another thing that I love to see are companies that are well known for certain product lines and they are Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Customer Focus, Design, Experience, innovation, Trends | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

The Three Building Blocks of Indie Capitalism – Ignore Them at Your Own Risk

Posted by Plish on December 8, 2011

Bruce Nussbaum over at fastcodesign.com has been blogging lately on creativity and what he coins is a new trend: Indie Capitalism.

The four traits of the Indie Capitalism are:

  1. It’s local, not global, and openly cares about the community and jobs.
  2. It’s not transactionally, but socially, based.
  3. It’s a maker system of economics based on creating new value, not trading old value.
  4. Materials and products are embedded with heightened meaning.

When I look at these four traits of indie capitalism, three foundational building blocks can be extracted:

  1. Relationships – Between people, cultures, the world and its raw materials.
  2. Emotional Import – People have histories and they live in contexts that can sometimes dehumanize. People need to feel!
  3. Value – This is often tied into the emotional level of experience.  When products or services uniquely meet needs, and they’re shared in the context of relationships, they have value.  This goes beyond technological value.  Things have value because of the story they tell.

How well does your organization emphasize, or enable REV! ?

Relationships – Emotion – Value 

Society is enabling people to conduct business in ways that build upon these.

It’s intimate and it’s provocative.

It pulls people in as opposed to pushing product out.

Ignore it at your own risk…

 

Posted in Authenticity, creativity, culture of innovation, Customer Focus, Design, innovation, Play, Social Innovation, Social Networking, Social Responsibility, Start-Ups, Sustainability, The Future, The Human Person, Trends | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

What Will the Future Hold?

Posted by Plish on November 3, 2009

future

The Behance Network put together this interesting view on the future based upon the scenarios from the Institute for the Future.  Some interesting perspectives, especially with regards to inter-species communication.  On the other hand, some of the solutions posited, like fertilizing oceans with iron to capture CO2,  are too current and thus not sophisticated enough to be included in a future in which digital body-swapping exists.

What are your thoughts?

Posted in Information Visualization, innovation, Sketching, Sustainable Technology, Trends | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

A Simple Method for Trend Forecasting

Posted by Plish on July 24, 2009

I came across this  article on trend forecasting and put together a little time-line to show approximately what is going on when new products come to market.

development process michaelplishka2009

Although the above chart is somewhat simplistic, it breaks down the phases of technology development.  I used a 20 year cycle as mentioned in the article although as soon as a product is introduced into the market the Refinement phase tends to get accelerated in an effort to gain full Acceptance quicker. 

That being said, 10 years of incubation in R&D for a ‘new to the world’ product is probably a good rule of thumb.  It may be longer or shorter depending on factors such as if the research is being done by private industry or the government.

So, how do you do your own trend forecasting?

1.  Got to Google News and do an advanced searchRead the rest of this entry »

Posted in Case Studies, Design, Disruptive Innovation, innovation, Innovation Tools, problem solving, Science, Start-Ups, Trends | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Innovation Never Sleeps, But It Does Nap…(Trends in Innovation)

Posted by Plish on December 29, 2008

One would think that innovation is first and foremost on everyone’s minds in the corporate world of the United States. Turns out that not only is it not front and center in the minds of US web surfers it actually is seasonal.

When searching on the word “innovation” in Google trends, I found that searches on the term “innovation” dip in the summer months and drastically dip in the month of December.

innovationtrend

Perhaps even more telling is that when search volume is normalized the United States doesn’t show up in the top ten regions for searches.

innovationcountryrankings

Different search terms could skew the results so I checked “creativity”.

creativitytrends

This shows the same Summer/December dips. The good news (or bad depending how you look at it), is that the US did make the top ten regions for search volume.

regionrankcreativity

Also of note is that the general trends for search volume and news references are going down and up respectively.

What about “entrepreneur”? Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Case Studies, culture of innovation, innovation, Innovation Metrics, Research, Trends | Tagged: , , , , | 2 Comments »

 
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